DNA alkylator/crosslinker is a molecule that alkylates DNA or can cross link with DNA. DNA alkylator/crosslinker can have mutagenic, pharmaceutical, or other effects. Alkylation is the transfer of an alkyl group from one molecule to another. The alkyl group may be transferred as an alkyl carbocation, a free radical, a carbanion or a carbene. Alkylating agents are widely used in chemistry because the alkyl group is probably the most common group encountered in organic molecules. Selective alkylation, or adding parts to the chain with the desired functional groups, is used, especially if there is no commonly available biological precursor. Alkylation with only one carbon is termed methylation. In medicine, alkylation of DNA is used in chemotherapy to damage the DNA of cancer cells. Alkylation is accomplished with the class of drugs called alkylating antineoplastic agents. Crosslinking of DNA occurs when various exogenous or endogenous agents react with two different positions in the DNA. This can either occur in the same strand (intrastrand crosslink) or in the opposite strands of the DNA (interstrand crosslink). Crosslinks also occur between DNA and protein. DNA replication is blocked by crosslinks, which causes replication arrest and cell death if the crosslink is not repaired. The RAD51 family plays a role in repair.

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2096333-48-9 (3-(4-Aminophenoxy)phenyl)boronic acid
BD4907002096333-48-997%
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